Total Art Soul - for artists

" Failures are finger posts on the road to achievement. "
C. S. Lewis

Kadi - Step by Step

Posted by: RaspberryDoodles

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RaspberryDoodles

There are times as an artist when a drawing takes hold of you. There is something about it that it almost draws itself.

This is that drawing for me.

The subject is Kadi, a Sumatran Tiger Cub born at the wonderful South Lakes Wild Animal Park

There were challenges in drawing from this photograph as I could not get a clear shot for the bars but I did have a couple of other shots which helped me fill in the gaps.

The drawing is on cartridge paper, my favourite as it is smooth and easy to build layers on.  It holds its form and strength whatever I do to it.  I should really start top left and work my way down but the temptation to start on the eye was just too great.

The contrast of dark and light make a dramatic drawing but provide more challenges to stop the colours smudging into each other.

A coloured pencil drawing requires a lot of layers to ensure realism.  It is important to understand how pencils work together to create new colours or textures, one colour is never enough.  There are no flat colours in nature, her beauty is in the variety.

The complete drawing.  This used a mix of Derwent Watercolour Pencils and Caran d'Ache pencils.  I like the softness of Derwent and the hard crisp edges of Caran d'Ache.

I am happy with this drawing.  Here is the scan of this drawing.

I love tigers and I hope it shows in my drawing.


Spring has come, at last! Sure, it's still a bit shy, but the trees did not hesitate: with the first sun rays, they started to stretch their branches and to dress them with beautiful small flowers. I love spring and I love trees in blossom! And I especially love the cherry trees.

To me, the delicate cherry flowers are the supreme symbol of purity and serenity, flowers capable, if we look at them attentively, of freeing us from the chaos of everyday life... look...

 

According to Chinese mythology, in the goddess Xi Wang Mu's magic garden grew immortality cherry trees and long-life cherries. Furthermore, in China the cherry tree wood is said to ward off evil spirits.

That is why, when I subscribed to the European Design Contest 2012 organised by Swarovski and I-Beads, I decided to make silver cherry flowers. The white and luminous silver is a purity symbol too and the petals' silver shine enhances the yellow pistils represented by 3 Flat Back Swarovski Topaze Strass 1,8 mm (3 strass x 4 flowers = 12 strass).

The first selection is based on the public's votes on the Internet. So, if you like this jewel, you can vote by clicking on the following link (and if you wish, you are also welcome to share it :-)

http://www.bloomingbeautifulcompetition.com/fr/design-gallerie/#146_1

This flower composition can be worn as a pendant, attached to a brown silk cord representing a branch, as a bracelet (you just need to wrap the "branch" around your wrist) or as a brooch.

I'll wait for your on the Blooming Beautiful's website : http://www.bloomingbeautifulcompetition.com/fr/design-gallerie/#146_1

Thank you and see you soon :-)

Si'



If you’ve ever been in Africa on a hot afternoon when the smouldering sun is intent on roasting anything which is stupid enough to be found exposed on the dry cracked hot plate of soil, then you will know what the intense heat of such an afternoon can do to an artist’s imagination. One of my favourite things to do on days when all sane individuals have retired to the cool shade of veranda’s and trees, is to brave the scorching heat and to walk into the veld.  Once alone I locate a small hill which will afford me an open view of a valley. From such a vantage point I can see miles across the swimming and dancing landscapes as the afternoon heat brings mirages and illusions of cool water flowing across the thirsty scene.

Once out of the stinging view of the sun, the hot shade of a Mimosa tree allows me to relax and enjoy the silence of the African bush.  It is a silence like no other and at first one could be excused for thinking that you have lost your hearing in the thick silence. It is like having a pillow over your head and just as you are about to click your fingers to reassure yourself that you have not lost your hearing suddenly some flying insect races past. Its sound passes, in stereo, first from one ear, then past your face and onto the next, punctuating the silence with its buzz. As you sit and wait, slowly your ears become accustomed to the soundtrack which accompanies the scene and you begin to hear the bush as if for the first time, the scene ushered in on an overture of sound from screeching cicada beetles.

To those who are familiar with the bush this will not be a new experience and will be one which is almost taken for granted.  For me who has had his ears anaesthetised by the white noise of the city however this is like regaining consciousness after surgery. The sounds of the hot afternoon begin to penetrate my memory banks of sounds deposited from the years I was raised in Africa.

I have never found it easy to paint in the outdoors; perhaps it’s the uncertain and disorderly nature of painting away from the familiar and ordered character of my studio that I find hard. Painting with watercolour under these conditions is difficult as the heat dries out the paper and pigment very fast, adding another layer of complexity to the process. On these occasions I rely on my camera, lenses and an ability to compile a scene which I will enjoy painting on my return to my little studio. During the long cold and damp months of an English winter, painting scenes like these will bring with them the warm memories and sounds of a hot afternoon in the veld. The contrast of colours are inspiring; from the vermillion orange of the aloe flowers to the duck-egg blue of the sky and from the rich browns and khaki shades of the grass to the deep greens of the mimosa trees.

 

The memory of this view and the small outcrop of iron stone boulders and shady mimosa trees will serve as the canvas on which I will paint the narrative of an afternoon spent in the company of these five lovely ladies the “red heads” of Harrison Farm.

Although I have many photographs of similar scenes I have used this lovely photo taken by my good friend and owner of Harriosn Farm & Harrison Hope Wine Estate, Ronnie Vehorn The Traveling Writer


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