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Reading Into Tomorrow

Posted by: Paul A Reeves

Tagged in: tomorrow , Scottish , Reeves , Reading , Paul , Painting , oil , canvas , artist , art

Paul A Reeves

Reading Into Tomorrow - Oil on canvas.

I was experimenting with painting using only very few colours and using colour to express mood. I had this painting in mind to reflect on the issue of the energy crisis in the future. How much are we dependent on electrical technology for communication and entertainment. Try going just one day without using anything electrical whatsoever. It’s not as easy as it sounds. Where would you be without your iphone, or your Kindle, or you computer? I have to admit, I’m not sure I’d like it myself.

 

 

The character in the painting is a self portrait. I’ve often used myself for many of my paintings, even if the characters are physically different, I still find myself an inexpensive and readily available model when I need such reference. I do enjoy using and painting other people when I get the opportunity.

 

Here I am while I was working on, Reading Into Tomorrow.

 

Prints of Reading Into Tomorrow, can be seen and purchased here, along with many others.

www.2canvas.co.uk Paul Reeves Art

And here.

www.pearlprints.co.uk Paul Reeves Art


Poppies And Remembrance

Posted by: Paul A Reeves

Tagged in: Remembrance , Reeves , Poppy , Poppies , Paul , Painting , impressionist , day , canvas , artist , art , acrylic

Paul A Reeves

I really wanted to try something a little different for these paintings. My background and training is in Scientific and Technical drawing, and many of my paintings, particularly my earlier ones, I have focused a great deal of effort into very intricate detail and perspective accuracy. I still focus a great deal of effort into my work and I have been developing and still exploring a much more distinctive style, which I am very happy with.

 

Poppies In The Wind - Acrylic on canvas.

 

I felt like trying to create an impressionist style of painting, and focus more on capturing an emotion as well as freezing an image in time. I do paint a lot of surreal paintings, and even my figurative work, I try to capture an emotion as well as an image, but with these new paintings I wanted the emotion to be the focus of attention.

 

Storm In The Poppies - Acrylic on canvas.

 

I have created quite a few paintings on the subject of war, and the damage it causes, but here I wanted to pay respect to those who have picked up arms in order to secure a privileged future for the rest of us. I hope I’ve managed to do that.

 

Prints of Poppies In The Wind, & Storm In The Poppies, can be seen and purchased here, along with many others.

www.2canvas.co.uk Paul Reeves Art

And here.

www.pearlprints.co.uk Paul Reeves Art


watercolor batik on rice paper architectural painting France

"French Windows." 12x12" watercolor batik on rice paper. Click on the image to buy prints or original painting.

Watercolor batik is a painting technique that has been floating around for a while. I have painted on fabric before (not batik method strictly speaking), I knew the theory (basically, you use wax/paraffin in place of masking liquid and rice paper in place of regular watercolor paper) and I kept seeing paintings done in this technique here and there. Finally, months after bookmarking a demo by Kathie George on Artists Network, I decided to give it a try.

Materials and gear:

  • Watercolor paints, obviously
  • Some kind of oriental/rice paper. I used something looking like the regular sumi-e rice paper (the one that has no sizing and makes your paint run like crazy)
  • Ink pen (optional). I used Pigma Micron
  • Brushes – your regular watercolor brushes plus something designated specifically for applying paraffin. I used a 1.5″ flat bristle brush from a hardware supply store and a couple of smaller bristle brushes.
  • Electric griddle or some other way to keep the paraffin melted.
  • Paraffin – I used a candle stump
  • Iron
  • Lots of newspapers/tissue paper/any thin absorbent paper that you can use for ironing the paraffin off your painting

The process

1. Make your drawing if you plan on having the lines. If you need to make a sketch first and then trace it onto the rice paper, be my guest. I drew straight on the rice paper – I think the uneven lines are not so horrible and actually add character.

watercolor batik tutorial ink drawing on rice paper

Here, I already decided what my lightest lights are (a term meaning the areas of the artwork that will be the lightest in value. In watercolor, you typically leave them untouched, no paint at all). I masked them out with melted paraffin.

2. Apply first wash of color. You will be working from light to dark, so decide what your next lightest areas are and fill them in. Often those are going to be your yellows, as they tend to be light in value. I also painted the bright colors of the flowers on the windowsills at this stage. I wanted to keep them fresh, so no more layers of paint on top.

demo watercolor batik step by step

3. Apply more paraffin to areas that you want to keep the way they are. Paint middle values.

step-by-step tutorial watercolor batik

4. Same thing. Mask out the areas that you are happy with and move on with another layer of watercolor. Here I am about to add the darks.

ink and watercolor on rice paper batik technique demonstration

5. The image below is almost completely covered with paraffin.

original watercolor batik painting in progress

6. More paraffin, more paint.

french architectural watercolor batik painting in process

7. Once you’re done, cover it all completely with paraffin and crinkle the paper. Apply a wash of color on top. I chose rusty orange to match the color of my ink lines. It will bleed into the cracks and bead on top of paraffin.

batik on rice paper watercolor

This step is optional. If you don’t want the web pattern on top of the painting, feel free to skip it.

8. Newspapers and iron time. Place the painting between several layers of newspaper or tissue paper and keep ironing until all of the paraffin comes off. You will need to change the layers of paper to new ones in the process.

rice paper watercolor batik

This is what it looked like after removing paraffin. I was fine with it for a day but then decided the white spots in the bottom third of the painting were just too distracting. When I tried painting them over, I couldn’t: there was still some paraffin in the paper. One extra ironing removed it and I was able to tone the white spots down.

Here is the finished version:

watercolor batik on rice paper architectural painting France

Detail views:

watercolor batik detail view

watercolor batik on rice paper detail view

batik watercolor painting

And a handy time lapse video: French Windows

Hope you enjoyed it! Questions? Suggestions? Comments?

Originally published at: http://watercoloredhands.com/2012/02/03/how-to-make-watercolor-batik-on-rice-paper-step-by-step-demo/

 


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